Defining Music of the 2020s

As this decade we’re in, the 2010s, draws to a close, and the 2020s await us, I sometimes wonder what will make the '20s stand out, musically. Will we be a part of defining that process? What sounds will people listen to? Will we get to create, (hopefully, low frequency, bassy!) compositions, that are part of music in the future?

What’s your vision for what the 2020s will be like in the world of music, both locally, and globally?

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Good question. There’s been so much good music made in the last 20 years that I’m really looking forward to it.

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Yep, good question. Personally I think “the whole” will crossover even more. Because of YouTube, and how many other (?) global music streaming platforms, the meld down has already begun. Indian Bhangra fused with west coast rap? Check. Mongolian Folk fused with Metal? Check. It will go on. I’m entirely looking forward to it. Too!

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:slight_smile:

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Mongolian Metal… Check.


You can kinda see how Ghengis Khan ruled his world, and why most of us carry his DNA marker!
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Yeah, I would have to agree here, that music fusion and crossover will only continue - such variety is just so accessible now, and for free - we live in a time where, globally, all musical styles and genres have such exposure. The only issue becomes getting eyes and ears to not only enjoy the music, but to stick with it, as there is almost too much choice now, and information overload.

In the end though, people still love music, and it still gets “voted” for, one way or another, though I think content distribution will continue to evolve, as well as the necessity of an ever-changing social media presence, for musicians.

As for me, I just want to play and learn for fun. I kind of hope that the next decade has some sound, or theme(s) that define it though, and isn’t so all-over-the-place.

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Is there an overall mix of styles you think could form a base for an era defining genre? As the tech moves forwards as well, it widens the ball park even more. We can already play wirelessly, we can hook up in (nearly) real time for a jam with my good friends in Quebec, Atlanta, Cape town, Zagreb, ad infinitum. I spoke to my grandson, all this he’s pretty much doing. He was Facetiming a new groove to someone in Scotland. They were beatboxing back. If the curve in tech continues and the way musicians interact within those frameworks evolves within it, the future becomes much brighter for a global music meltdown!

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Great question! One that I don’t have an answer to. Wondering what others think. Just trying to wrap my brain around much of what’s out there, who listens to it, what it overlaps with, and whether it’s very niche, or ready to breakout for a more “mainstream” audience!

This kind of stuff is awesome, and the tech is at a point now, where bandwidth, and quality are no longer issues. Though I’m never sure if this kind of collaboration takes away from sometimes local movements that need to evolve within their own ecosystem first, (ex: UK punk in the late 70s, or Seattle grunge, early 90s).

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