GAS - Gear Acquisition Syndrome

Hello. My name is Brandon and…I’m addicted to getting new gear.

@eric.kiser told me this is commonly called GAS or gear acquisition syndrome. He told me I am among friends here and I should be able to open up about my affliction.

I have not even had a chance to play my new ESP yet and already I have found a new deal.

Ibanez geo 5 string bass guitar, 1 Fender acoustic bass, Orange bass amplifier, small Ibanez amp, digi-tech effects pedal, 2 cases. Asking price was $540 but I offered up a spare pistol I no longer carry and the guy said he would be interested.

But I am justifying this because I currently don’t have a 5 string OR an acoustic, and orange amps seem decent. But I think soon I’m going to need to stop…I’m going to run out of room

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Dude you have it bad

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Your situation sounds terribly unfortunate. Might I recommend getting a bigger place with a dedicated studio? It’s the only way to make this right.

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According to the New England Journal of Medicine, that is Advanced GAS, not seen as often as General GAS, but to be taken rather seriously. The CDC might have to deploy a platoon, but before it comes that far, use some healthy doses of SRAC (Stop Reading Any Classifieds) and PYDA (Play Your Darn Axe).

In very extreme cases, it might be advisable to follow the GAS-driven impulses first to take off any dangerous over-pressures, and then revert to taking the meds. In any case, professional help and counseling might have to be sought…

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You only live once, I say go for it have fun, you can always re-sell/trade-in unused gear for something else down the road.

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Let’s hope he won’t need surgery :slight_smile:

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Yes, this. Dr. @joergkutter’s suggestions for a remedy are spot on! I had this dilemma early on, multiple browser tabs open to a bunch of sites selling gear, and wasting a part of the day on getting obsessed with something I saw, researching it to no end, and deciding it must be “the one”. Only to find another “the one” the next day, or even a few hours later. My actual bass sat unplayed. Until I realized that it already was “the one” (okay, “the two”, but whatever :wink:), and, followed the course of SRAC and PYDA until the advanced GAS outbreak subsided.

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Can you actually see my internet right now? I think that the combination of SRAC and PYDA treatment plans are just what I need!

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This is what Doctor Josh recommends too. :slight_smile:

On a serious note, some more doctor’s notes:

Researching gear (and buying a bunch of it) is mostly a waste of time until you learn more about bass playing, tone, and what really matters on a bandstand. Reading tech specs and watching review videos will get you almost nowhere without a solid foundation in bass playing.

I knew almost nothing about gear for the first decade of playing, and only ever had one bass/amp at a time in those days for even longer. And I’m really glad I didn’t get into gear until recently, because I never thought of gear as a solution to a musical problem, I always used my mind and fingers instead. Which is also a lot cheaper.

AND now that I am interested in gear, the history of the electric bass and bass tone, etc., I have a super solid foundation of gigging, recording, and touring that I can use to contextualize everything I see/hear/read.

So have fun and GAS away… but don’t lose focus on the stuff that actually matters. My 2 cents! /doctorjoshout

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@brandoncmurphy you have a very severe case of GAS… one of the worst I’ve ever seen, but it is curable. I’ve cured other people by using the following method, and I’m sure I can cure you.

(1) Go online and order all those items you mentioned.
(2) When you order, DO NOT GIVE THEM YOUR ADDRESS FOR SHIPPING.
(3) Give the seller MY address for shipping.
(4) Pay for the items with your credit card.

I can almost guarantee this will cure your severe GAS. If it doesn’t we’ll just have to repeat the therapy as many times as it takes to get rid of it.

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I so wish I had suggested this first.

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I’ve got GAS!

I’ve been good (not by choice) and restrained myself for months - the last needless GASing was a new set of flat wound string that were a bargain - but I find myself constantly looking for a Squier Vintage Modified jazz (now discontinued and rising in price). But here’s the rub; so many of you guys rave about Yamaha and I keep seeing used ones for not much more than a Squier VM.

Here is one that popped up on my radar last night. https://www.gumtree.com/p/for-sale/yamaha-trb-1004j-bass-guitar-with-flight-case/1359908577?utm_campaign=socialbuttons&utm_campaign=socialbuttons&utm_content=app_ios&utm_medium=social&utm_source=ios_social

If you don’t want to follow the link, it’s a TRB1004J in translucent black, in hard case for £400. I suppose the “super long neck” a 35” might be an issue for a beginner.

My question is this; which range is the most popular around here; BB, TRBX, 200, 300, 400, 600, something older?

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I don’t think you will be disappointed with this bass/model, unless this particular instruments has some issues. It looks a bit worn here and there, but nothing major (judging from the pictures). The point about the strings is moot, of course, as you want a setup and a new set of strings pretty much when you get it.

My TRB5PII has 35" as well and it is not a big issue! And this model here seems to have similar (active) electronics and pickups.

But, let’s wait and hear from @howard - he knows ALL the Yammy models :grin:

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BB’s are timeless. TRBX is a new line that is a mix in style of the older TRB and RBX lines (or at least Yamaha says so.) The numbers are level, roughly ranging from entry level to higher end, the higher they go. TRB 1004 looks like a very nice guitar to me. Never played one though. It’s kind of similar to @joergkutter’s Yamaha. Some nice features on it like a 5-piece neck and active electronics. Alder/Maple so it’s probably light for its size. I also love the Translucent Black - I never much liked black guitars until I saw Ibanez and Yamaha’s translucents.

Here’s Yamaha’s page on it:

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No I don’t! Just the ones I have tried :slight_smile:

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Haha - there can’t be many left that you haven’t played, though!

Talk about messages and mentions crossing here :rofl:

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I always thought the long neck is only used for 5-string basses, as it usually helps in avoiding flubby B strings… Not sure what pros and cons it has for a 4-string. But, playing-wise, not a big deal!!

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Hehe.

Let’s see. I’ve played the BB and TRBX lines extensively as my friend had a BB and I’ve had two TRBX; played a few RBX and MB a bit in a store, and ogled at a couple TRB :slight_smile:

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Ignoring tone, is there much difference in feel & playability between the ranges?

This is where being so poorly catered for in terms of music shops really bites me hard: not only do I not get. A big choice, but I get so little opportunity to play a range of models. I more or less have to buy whatever they happen to have (used), whatever they have new (very limited in the mid price range), or buy online. Even my private sales options are extremely limited.

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You are not alone with this, @PeteP. I remember, a few months back, we had a discussion about the demise of the small local instrument shop. But even the bigger ones are hurting - at least, or especially, those who don’t have a functioning internet shop as well.

@howard is blessed with entire neighborhoods in Tokyo catering to musicians, while here in Copenhagen, one of the bigger ones recently closed down shop.

In any case, perhaps you have a chance to test-drive this particular bass before making an offer??!! This way, you could get at least some idea about how it feels for you!

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