Talking Bass 25 Groove Challenge

Lucky 13!

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I found #14 challenging. Synchronizing the left hand rake with the 16th note triplet took me 3 days to get and get it up to speed. But once I got it it was fun to play.

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Funky! Did you have an envelope filter on or was that funk all you?

Loved it

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Thanks @John_E! No effects besides compression. That was all Bass with the treble and bass boosted slightly.

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Moving along. Number 15 is harder than I thought it would be.

Hey @T_dub, where are you at? You’ve been MIA. Everything ok?

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Number 16 involves double stop chords. :worried:
It looked hard to do at first but in actuality I found it pretty easy to play. I was able to complete the exercise and record it during my lunch hour. Pretty fun to play!

Sounds clean. I’ve never known what exactly is meant by “double stop”. Is it just playing 2 strings at once?

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You keep saying how hard these are and then nailing them.

I gotta jump in this train, I love how funky they are

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Nice, very Devo-ish.

Ok. I’m starting these this weekend.

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My understanding is that a double stop is playing 2 notes at the same time. Triple stop would be 3 notes.

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Ha ha they look hard when I watch Mark play them.
Many I can’t play when I start them. I start really slow to get them under my fingers, and then some I get fast, some take me some work.

Awesome! I’ve definitely seen improvement in dexterity since I started these.

Look at the description for #17. Doesn’t it sound hard?

Groove #17 makes use of more double stops, this time combined with slides and hammer on’s in a funk setting.

Isn’t 3 notes a chord? Or is it that a triple stop doesn’t have to be “official” chord tones?

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I think a chord the notes are played in succession, a stop in conjunction. But I’m not 100% sure.

With chords you play the notes simultaneously. Playing the notes of a chord one at a time is an arpeggio. Unless I am missing something :slight_smile:

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Sometimes chord and arpeggio are used interchangeably. A sax can’t play a ‘chord’ but folks will refer to an chord on an instrument like that and really mean arpeggio. I think it’s chord envy for the polyphonic instruments.

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In this video Mark Smith refers to a double stop as a two note chord, so I guess it’s a chord.

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Interesting, I’d never heard the term “double-stop.” Yes, any time two or more notes are played at once, it’s a chord. Specifically, for two notes, a dyad (had to look that up to remember it). At least for every other instrument I have played.

“Double-stop” looks like a term that started with guitars, cool. Learn something every day.

@John_E - I’ve only played two monophonic instruments and only one of those for any length of time, so I’m far from an expert, but I remember “arpeggios” as a thing on those too :slight_smile:

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