Tuning up

Hi I have been playing for about a year and was wondering is it safe to tune the d and g strings on mybass a step up from standered making the tuning (E A E A)
can standard strings take that much extra tension or would it, be to much for them to take?

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I can’t answer your question, but perhaps someone else can.
However, I have a question of my own…
Why? :thinking:

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Just thought it would sound cool

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Alternate tunings are awesome!

I can’t answer you because I always tune down, not up. It’s a good question. My current strings have a very high tension G string and I would be a little reticent to try this.

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You could get a similar string pattern by tuning the lower two strings down a whole step DGDG. Like Howard, I generally tune down.
I think it might be okay to experiment and over tune the strings for a short time but I would not leave them pitched that way too long especially if I wanted to use them back in standard tuning
Sometimes upright players use “solo” strings which are pitched up a whole step and can be left tuned that way (F#BEA)

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Josh has always said that you should err on the side of tuning down. Because tuning your strings too tightly could break them. I would recommend going to a local music store and asking the guys there if it’s safe to tune up to EAEA.

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I love tuning all weird.
The bass and strings can take it.

However - if you leave it, or keep it that way for extended periods, you’ll start to mess with the neck. If you’re really into that tuning, consider getting a beater bass and trying out different gauge strings for different tunings.
The same strings tuned up a whole step put a lot of stress on the neck.
Fine for a short burst - but if you’re going back and forth, or leave it tuned up, it will start to create problems.

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I tried the DGDG tuning last night
Fun!

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I love Drop D in general, and tuning the A down must sound killer too.

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I would try other tunings but I have this weird phobia that I won’t be able to tune it back to standard tuning. Stop it brain! You’re freaking me out god dammit. Anyways, I’ll try it today.

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my problem is my e and a are super low tension so if i tune them down a whole step im afraid they will be to lose to play

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How’s this for an idea? Just leave your bass tuned to EADG and get back to practicing and becoming an outstanding bass player.

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Isn’t the willingness to experiment part of becoming an outstanding bass player?

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For sure. Nothing wrong with exploring alternate tunings, no need to limit yourself to (B)EADG.

Drop D especially is easy, versatile, useful and fun.

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Perhaps at some point, but becoming highly proficient at the fundamentals should be the first priority. I can see if you are a busy gigging bassist and you need an extra bass with a drop D for certain songs on the setlist (as Roger Waters did). But for someone to just do it to experiment seems very odd to me, in fact it seems like it would be very confusing as many of the notes have relocated.
But to each his/her own. Me, I’ll stick with the standard BEADG tuning (EADG if I played 4 string).

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It’s really not that confusing, you get used to the difference fast and quicky get to where you can just shift back and forth. It’s actually a lot of fun.

It’s also unlikely that the genres you like have much usage of Drop D, whereas the opposite is true for some of us.

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First you trigger me with mentioning Tiny Tim …NOW you trigger me with actually seeing the strings of a 5er written out…now when I think of a five string I can’t get the Bead Gee’s out of my head and it its worse I have a vision of Flea in tighty whiteies playing disco ( and singing like the tightys are WAY to tight )…THANKS now I have to make a trip to the liquor store for a couples of fifths of Rye…

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