All the right notes or timing

As I’m learning a new song I’ve found that I’m tempted to try and hit all the right notes at times to the detriment of timing.
Is this a flaw in my playing or something I should worry about?
I do get stuck into the timing as I improve but I was wondering if my fellow bass buzzers do things differently?

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Timing is more important than playing all the notes :slight_smile:

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Timing is more important, even if it means you only play root and fifths. Groove is key.

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Whenever I hear the words ‘all the right notes’ I can’t help but think of this.

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But not necessarily in the right order :joy:
I was actually thinking about that when I was posting this

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@Mac whenever I’m early or late coming in to the start of a song. In my head I can hear Steve Martin.

“I have the gift that all great comedians have…timing, ti…ming, timing etc”

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:joy:

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“Never lose the groove to find a note” -Victor Wooten

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Hit the one - Bootsy Collins

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All timing. A great man once sang, “you cant hold no groove if ya ain’t got no pocket.”

Also while watching a Cory Wong video (diner? Or something along those lines maybe…) I noticed that those really REALLY sikk bassists, yea? Actually have no solid foundation in the song. Compared to a studio recording for example, those play with every band pretty talented yet not overly imaginative, let’s say, will play any song exactly as they would any other time but I noticed (because I can’t either) the REALLY renowned bassists never play a song the same twice. It’s like once it’s down that’s original it can only be improved upon and never duplicated. I don’t know I might losing it maybe…

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Oh yea I forgot to say that’s the man that said my quote.

-Victor Wooten

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Mark Smith implores, “you can get away with a wrong note here and there, but god help you if you miss a beat” (paraphrased).
I live by those words.

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they’re not mutually exclusive; slow down enough that you can do both, then gradually speed up.

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See my “am I too strict on myself” topic as I have the same issue of wanting to play a song correctly.
Everyone there basically says the same thing: don’t worry about missing a note or two, focus on the groove.

That’s our job, laying down the groove. Only fellow bass players that know the specific songs will know whether you missed something but if you lose the groove everyone will know.

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This is a major issue.
I have some stupid level of playing I think I should be at for the time I’ve been at it and frequently feel disappointed with my efforts

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except all the white people clapping on beats 1 and 3 :joy:

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You’re like their pied piper. If you lose the groove, they will wander off into who knows what kinds of rhythmic catastrophies. They might even fall down. DON’T LET THEM DOWN! THEY NEED YOU.

I like the way this was put to me: A band can survive a bad guitarist. A band can survive a terrible vocalist. But if you have a rhythm section without groove, you’re hosed.

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Don’t get me started, seen plenty of people who have no sense of rhythm whatsoever during the Nijmegen Marches festival :roll_eyes:

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Navin R. Johnson is all I can think of when this is mentioned.

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When I read your post it gave me the impression you are talking about fairly early stages in the process of learning a song that is new to you. In contrast, most of the replies I read seem to be about performing that song, and if sacrificing an element of the bass part is necessary, it’s better to sacrifice a note than a beat of the groove.
If your post was about the phase of learning a new song, as I thought it was, then consider my thoughts.
Getting those new notes down, precisely as they were layed down on the recorded track you are listening to and learning from, is extremely important.
Some may argue that the groove is more important. I get it. I understand their point and I’m not arguing against it. But the notes retain their high value. In a cover band, do everything in your power to mimic the bassline exactly as it sounds on the recording. And, as you discipline yourself in this role, you will find your personal skills as a bassist will grow and improve with time. Songs with difficult bass licks ? Fast ? Tricky structure ? You can do it!
Break it down into small parts. Nail each one. Put them together again.
You’ll be playing that song you once thought was impossible for you.
Your sense of accomplishment will drive you to learn more and more difficult songs.
Peace and love, brother,
Pippo

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