Ear training

looking for a good ear training program, or site ect, i’ve looked at some of the apps, havent had much luck

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To start off with, @JoshFossgreen often suggests this site:

There are several types of exercises, among them ear training for notes, intervals, scales, …

Should keep you busy for a bit :smile:

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I know Rick Beato does an ear training course. It is expensive but if Rick has designed it I think it would be worth it.
https://beatoeartraining.com/

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I would love to learn this, too. I always had trouble finding the bass parts in recordings when no TAB was available. Some songs are just not available. It would be really nice to pick the bass parts out. It’s just some mixes bury the bass parts to bring out instruments in parts of the track, which is what’s supposed to happen. It just gets frustrating. Thanks for the resources.

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I’m doing the ear training and it’s getting better and better… a thing I wanted to add and one thing that is weird to add after I said in the other thread “music theory isn’t that important” is: Very basic music theory helps so you know scales and typical bass lines on those scales. Basically “what could it be?” depending on the musical context.

You don’t necessarily need to determine the pitch of the bass, which at least to me is harder because of the low frequency but you can find out which key the song is in and then listen to an isntrument higher in the spectrum, e.g guitar. If the guitar plays an A chord you already have only a subset of notes to listen for.

I am not able to write out a bassline by ear but I am pretty sure that this basic music theory (what key is the song in, standard scales) helps.

Then again - what I talk about here is all part of the B2B course. No additional sources on music theory needed.