Good Music Theory YT Playlist

I’ve been watching these videos. They are great. She is very good at explaining things. This is her whole music theory playlist (18 videos). Enjoy.

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Yes, I’ve found her great with explaining theory. And she’s still adding videos…

I have the same problem with this video that I have with every video I’ve seen on the Circle of Fifths. She doesn’t bother with context.

She seems like a nice enough lady and she explains it well but, like every other video, she never bothers to explain why this is important or why you would want to learn this.

I can tell it would help with reading music since, traditionally, the sharps and flats aren’t notated on the individual notes.

I can imagine it is helpful in figuring out or memorizing the notes in all the keys.

Are there other reasons for learning the Circle of Fifths?

First (will answer your question in a minute) - the best way i have found is to simply engrave it into your brain, memorize the thing. I wrote it down over and over and over, first the circle, then each scale, backwards/forwards etc. Over and over while watching TV, or just chilling. Before bed, etc - used my ipad so I didn’t wipe out a forest for the paper.

So why do you want to memorize it?
If you ever want to improvise in any reasonable fashion over chord changes, you need to know what notes work and what don’t in each ‘key’. F#Maj chord, what notes do you play? You need your scale, which comes from the construct of the circle and the keys. These have to be emblazened in your brain just like your native language is as there is no time when playing to go 'ok, F#Maj, I have x/y/z available to play, so I think I will play…z/z/y/x. Ain’t no time for all that thinking, has to be second nature.

Want to write music? Same applies.

Want to play bass tabs and have fun - no need, rock on dude.

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This is one of the best answers I have seen to why learn the Circle of Fifths/Fourths.
Of course @John_E picked a key that has 6 Sharps in it. :slightly_smiling_face:

Another use would be to get shapes for Scales you do not know or to get a shape for just the 1 (Root), 5th, and Octave for a particular Key although if you know the Key signature this should not be an issue because the patterns for all the Major scales on Bass are the same as long as you know where the Root note is but some people like it drawn out anyways. Here is one example of each of these for the Key of F♯ Major @John_E mentioned.

Right but what do you do if the tabs are wrong - or does that never happen :joy: :joy: :joy:

On shapes…they are a fine learning tool, but not the ‘way to play’.
If you really want to be able to improvise, you need to know your notes and where they are to play them.
Playing a shape let’s you improvise in shapes.

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I understand what you are saying but most beginners seem to prefer shapes.
Probably the same ones that say they do not need theory because they use tabs :joy: :joy: