Jordin bass info

My recent acquisition (the 5 string) is “badged” as a Jordin bass.
I’ve trawled the internet and I can find nothing about this manufacturer other than they may be an offshoot of Samick .
Can anyone else throw some light on anything other than this?
TIA

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There are quite a few manufacturers that are typically no more than a brand label and exporter. Once there are companies like Cortek who will bulk manufacture for many established brands, there’s no entry bar to anyone who wants to put their name to a bass without the hassle of running a factory.
This situation exists in many aspects around the world and it’s a good way to get something without the perceived quality benefits of a brand name, at a lower price point. Of course, the alternate reality also exists.
A good indication of a low end retail outfit is the lack of an established web presence.
If you can’t find something on the internet within a few minutes of googling, it’s an absolutely gold clad indication that the manufacturer can’t be bothered making a presence on the biggest globally accessible billboard on the history of the planet.

You could and likely should attribute this to the expectation that they don’t have to because it won’t help them in any way.

I own all sorts of things from manufacturers that don’t have a web presence. It doesn’t stop them working. You’re lucky that basses will rarely have a critical firmware update.

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@mac, you have any pics of the bass?

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I have @Ruknrole but for some reason I’m having a lot of trouble uploading pictures on the forum recently.
I’ll try again when I have my iPad and I’m nearly sat on my router
There is a picture in the GAS thread which I’ll try and link?

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I’m a newbie to bass, so this is a general observation. It looks a bit like a Warwick.

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It looks a lot like a Warwick Thumb.

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That’s exactly why I bought it @Bassdacious @howard :+1:
That and the Seymour Duncan preamp/pickup combination

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How does it sound? Did you get a good deal? Any more in Melbourne? :joy:

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It sounds lovely and smooth. Very mellow but I’m still playing around with the preamp and still learning to remember that I have an extra string lol.
I paid just over $500 delivered which I was happy enough with for the Seymour Duncan stuff.
And no I haven’t seen anymore lol. Although I’m prowling eBay, Gumtree etc every night :scream:

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Not a bad price, I think. The tuners look to be pretty good quality, enclosed and solid. It’s a nice looking bass too IMO.

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Yeah I’m well pleased with it.
Play around on it most days although I’m no where near as proficient as I am on a 4 string.
Ordered an adjustable nut and a truss rod cover for it just to finish it off

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Yea nice looking bass. Maybe someone”s private build.

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Not much out there bout it looks to be an Australian made brand, or made for the Australian market.

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Good point about the personal build.
I have found a couple of other Jordin basses but they’re Jazz bass type ones .

There are 8 zillions saxophone “Brands” made in China and now even in India.
They are not really brands, but a name on a horn. You can go to NAMM, find a manufacturer and put whatever name you like as a ‘brand’. I have a buddy who does this with soprano saxophones and makes a killing on entry level horns.

here is the problem with these instruments….
Historically, they were horrible, but have gotten better at quality…out of the box.
They are virtually unrepairable if damaged or if needing general maintenance.
I have a Chinese curved soprano I bought as a test from the ‘best’ manufacturer out there. Cost me $300 and that included air freight from china in 4 days, customization of finish and engraving. It plays ok, I tweaked the setup and it plays okay+. It beat buying a $2000-4000 curved sop at the time. Here’s the thing….its disposable. The pads wont last more than a couple years, an overhaul is $1200-$1500 and most sax techs wont work on Chinese horns cause everything it too ‘soft’ and bends. So after playing a while it goes all wonky, and you toss it or make a lamp and buy another one.

This model goes for all instruments btw.
The biggest thing I would say here is even if it plays well today, give it a couple seasonal cycles and then see if the neck is warped beyond repair, etc.
Consider these things ‘throw always’.
For the money, I’d buy a Squier used or similar long before one of these.

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Time will tell @John_E

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