Module 8 Lesson 4 Triads - Muting Issue

I had to lay off the bass for a couple of weeks on account of thumb pain in my right hand (anchor thumb). I have an autoimmune disorder that cycles through me on occasion. It can and does make my hands, fingers, toes, knees, tendons hurt. So, while I was inflamed I had to just lay off completely except for a short practice in the middle somewhere.

Since the layoff, I found my fretting improved considerably, and so I started up again on Module 8 Lesson 4 - where I left off before my body betrayed me…

So, I completely get the triads and the improv, and I even understand the Fm scale with open strings. The problem I’m having is with the 3rd, which is the open string. There’s no fretting finger. I guess early on I had gotten used to muting by releasing my finger from the fret while letting the finger rest on the string. It seemed so natural, and it works very well for me, but here when I play the 3rd (A) and come back to Root (F), I can’t seem to figure out how to mute the A string. Unless I am going to the 5th © the A string tends to ring.

How should I think about this? I tried rolling my index finger, but it didn’t seem to work very well( though I’m not sure why). The other way to go was to try to fret F with my middle and reserve my index for muting A, and that was really awkward. I’m thinking finger roll, and I just need to bear down on that.

What do you guys think? …or is there a better way?

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Both are viable and even muting with the right hand would be a possibility depending on where you put that open string in the rythm.
I usually try to do it with the finger I play the next note with if it’s only a string crossing and not a complete jump over one string so I guess in this case I would roll my index over/have it relatively flat so it mutes the higher strings.

Did you see Joshs recent video about muting? I have nothing to add to that :wink:

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@kwt7667 dont forget that you can also mute with your plucking hand. I think it’s handy when your frettings hand has a lot of work to do.
Jamie

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I hear you guys. What makes this string crossing difficult for me is that I’m going to a lower string, so my right hand is moving off the A String altogether as my hand is perched on the pickup. I guess I need a flatter finger profile, so that I fret the first fret of the E and A strings together.

How do you do this? Do you remember this workout?

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I kind of remember it. I’m not sure if I muted the open string correctly. I would not stress out too much about it. There’s a reason Josh always mentions muting as sidenote - It’s additional coordination and work with your fingers and will come easier to you with time and experience.

That’s what I was trying to say what I would do in my first post.

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@juli0r I appreciate your comments. I’ll do the best I can with it, and it I’m not ready, I’m not ready…but I am ready to move on to the next lesson! :laughing:

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I just had fun with improv and the backing tracks. Sunk into my own world as Josh suggested. I think I remember now - I think I mostly avoided the situations you describe and just played the 5th afterwards for the most part.
But it’s actually not that hard once you get used to it. That’s why I’m having problems to tell you “this is how to do it.”. Because by now it feels to me like you have all the time in the world to mute the string with whatever technique you chose.

Moving on is generally a good mindset for the course so if you are satisfied I don’t think you should stress out over muting. If you want to work on it I would just suggest to try out the different techniques Josh mentions in his video very slowly and deliberately. Even slower than the slow workout or even without regard of timing/tempo.
There isn’t one right answer for muting open strings - they are all right and you just have to chose what fits best for your hands and the current piece you are playing.

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Yes!!! That’s what I did too. Sounds better to my ear anyway finishing on 4 with the 5th.

I agree. And, it’s weird how it works, but sometimes you just subliminally figure it out. It’s that instinct I mention from time time to time. As you say, learn the techniques, and then you sort it out later. It’s kinda comes along organically. Thanks!

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Just a quick comment, and I apologize if I misunderstood what you really needed to know: but if you go from the A to the E string in order to fret a note on the E string now, and if you are worried about the “unattended” A string, you don’t need to fret on both strings; it is sufficient that you touch the A string with the finger that frets on the E string in order to mute the A string sufficiently.

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Thanks @joergkutter That’s what I was getting at. It’ll take some concentration to teach the index finger that new trick; a new tool I’ll have to add to my bag!

…back to isolation practice.

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@joergkutter that now makes more sense, thanks for that
Jamie

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