Noob amp question

So those of you that have read my posts, know that I am a total noob. I have a noob question. The one cheap little 20 or 25 watt Stephens amp I repaired and have been using has what looks to be a digital display that looks like a tuner. It doesn’t seem to work though, or maybe it works really crappy? I am not sure if I am using it wrong, or it was a piece of junk when it worked, or its something I need to fix on the amp. (I am good at electronics repair)

It seems way all over the place and SUCKs trying to tune on it vs my little clip on tuner. Whats the deal with this thing? Do they just suck? Or is a properly working one worth using?

Heres a pic of it.

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Also, an addon question. I just recently fixed a whole bunch of amps. They are all missing the backs, because someone has been in them before, at least to look. Does having the back on make for better sound? I felt like it might, so I made a back for the one pictured above, and I really didn’t notice a difference in sound. Is it worth making backs for the rest of them? I mean it obviously helps keep crap out of them (dog hair), but does it really matter much?

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Just checking, is this a bass amp or a guitar amp? If it is a guitar amp and not a chromatic tuner then you might have problems. If it is a chromatic tuner, which most are nowadays then it should work. Chromatic just means it isn’t locked into a specific frequency range. It is possible it is just a bad tuner or doesn’t work. A video would help more than a picture to give advice here.

As for back of amps, I’m sure it impacts the sound as the amp would have been designed with the back in mind, but as the sound is coming out of the front primarily I doubt it is noticeable to the average listener. However, I would keep the back on for protecting the amp.

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Its a guitar amp. I’m still too much of a noob to know what a chromatic tuner is, or isn’t. I’ve also built backs for the other 2 amps. I figured they were designed with them, so they are supposed to have them. Plus it keeps crap from getting in there. As for the built in tuner, ??? IDK, I’m not putting my money on it being accurate even when it was new.

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I think as a general rule, standalone tuners are considered better (more accurate) than built-in tuners (to amps or multi-effects devices). This is not always the case though. If you are confident that your clip-on tuner is accurate enough, then I’d just stick with that for now.

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it may be ok?
I’d have to see a video of you playing your bass and what the tuner is doing.

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@IIIQuaZIII

Be careful.
Guitar amps are not designed to handle the lower frequencies of a Bass.
If you crank that amp up sooner or later you will blow the speaker.

Also the tonal quality from the guitar amp when used with a Bass will be nowhere near what it should be.

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It’s an old amp for sure, this version has wood. Looks pretty cool! https://jedistar.com/stephens-audio/

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Yeah a couple people have told me that. But, for what I’m doing with it now its fine. I dont crank it up. I am just sitting practicing quietly. I wouldnt try to use it at a show or anything. I also have a 50 watt “Stage” brand stand alone amp with a 12" speaker I built a box for that sounds a lot better than this thing. I was considering trying a sub woofer in the box for that.

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Practicing through a guitar amp at low volume is absolutely fine. It’ll start to ‘flubb out’ (technical term i invented) when you crank it but if it’s what you’ve got, then it’s the right amp for now.

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I know exactly what you mean by Flubb out…lol. I over drived the little 10 watt fender with the like 4" speaker in it passed 1/3rd volume lol.

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