Quick introduction to musical notation

I’ll just leave this here:

I don’t think this belongs in theory as it’s more of a fun video and you already need to understand what he talks about to get it. I didn’t get everything :frowning:

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And since I had to look up what I didn’t get (common time, cut time) here is actually the best crash course or cheat sheet for reading music that I’ve seen: https://melodyful.com/complete-list-of-music-symbols-with-their-meaning

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Thanks @juli0r
I’ve saved that link :+1:

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It’s humorous, that’s all I can say about it.

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Sorry, was meant to be in Lounge. Moved it :slight_smile:

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That was great! And pretty much 100% accurate.

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At the risk of sounding like a nitpicker…

I would hardly call this a “Sight Reading course”. A quick primer on musical notation? Yes, but not sight reading. Sight reading is the ability to look at a sheet of music and instantly play it with only minimal forethought. It’s a skill that requires hours and hours and hours and hours of constant practice. Trust me, I know… I’ve been hammering away at this for months now and still have a long way go.

It is cute though :smiley_cat: :heart_eyes_cat:

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Fixed it :wink:

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Oh you didn’t have to do that, I’m sorry I wasn’t chiding you about it. But I will say the new title is much more appropriate :smiley_cat:

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The Brits crack me up with their note names. A quarter note is a crotchet. A half note is a minim. A whole note is a semibreve (seems like it should be a double-minim, but then it wouldn’t be a minim). An eighth note is a quaver. Sixteenth note a semi-quaver. 32nd notes are demisemiquavers, and the one that breaks the score is the 64th note or hemidemisemiquaver.

Trombone glissandi aren’t just for trombones, either. :slight_smile:

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