Random Fun Polls

Slap is fun, and I love hearing it, and I CAN’T SEEM TO GET ENUF OF IT.

I really was both terrified and nervously excited going into the slap module for B2B. The only slap I had ever attempted prior to B2B, was the little Excercises Flea teaches in his video lesson that was sold with his Basses.
AND I WAS HORRIBLE!!!
So
When I read of others saying “wait til you get to the Slap Mod…
I thought of skipping it…
Man was I wrong. I loved it, and with @JoshFossgreen. Stellar instruction, tips and technique, I was able to catch on quick.

I have since been learning “Take the power back” which is mostly slap. Can’t stop popping off that riff while I am sitting in my living room watching TV or something. There are some ghost notes that are key for timing I M working on, but overall, I love where I am with it.
I have since braved out to test the waters, and the FOOL I am, I tried learning “tommy the cat”
Funny thing is, I almost got it, and it’s one of Less’s tougher lines.
No way could I play it thru the whole song, and it’s nor correct to the “Sailong the Seas of Cheese” version, but it’s pretty close to the earlier live version from “Suck on this”, which I will confess, is also played a bit slower.

But my point is, I thought I would suck at it, but after giving it a shot, then going out to learn some songs, I love it. Plus I have ALWAYS loved Primus, “Tommy the Cat” was actually my and my X wife’s wedding song. Back in ‘96, and wedding over, I still have Primus :+1:t2::+1:t2:.
I also learned tapping, I thought I would suck at that too. Now I AM PLAYING (pretty goot tooo, still needs work, but it is very recognizable) “Jerry Was A Race Car Driver”. I never thought that would happen.

Also, when I got my first Bass off CL, I needed some stuff off Amazon, like Strap, ables, stand, and I ordered a pack of picks, I had full intentions of being a pick player. Well…I much prefer finger plucking (along with slap and tap) over picking. I will not ignore picking, I think it is very important to be able to do both finger plucking and picking, and for me, slap and tap.

I guess my point is, I stayed open to all options, and kind of let the bass, music, and lessons guide me, and I believe, for me, it s turning me not a more multi dimensional bass musician then I had hoped and even planned for.
Unless you are dead set against it, I would highly suggest giving Slap a real go.
If you did the Slap mod in B2B, go bCk and do it again, then maybe a few Slap Bass Buzz YT videos, and maybe some others like Talking Bass, showing some easy slap riffs. And then try “Take the power Back”. It’s not that hard, and Josh teaches it. Think of it as another B2B lesson. It’s on Joshes YT channel. He does a cover play thru in one vid, then a tutorial with tabs, teaching the main riff, breaking down each fill, and some of the cords used in other sections of the song.
It is great fun, and may change your mind about Slap.
Or may confirm you don’t like it, and you can bash me for suggesting it.
I won’t mind lol, if you hate it still, I maybe shouldn’t have encouraged you to do it, IDK, but I think you will like it after trying, it’s very rewarding…at least for me it was.

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Great poll @Vik!

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Not mine either. I pretty much glossed over the slap lesson in B2B. Spanked my bass a couple times, then moved on.

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Hahaha!!! I’ll probably give it my best just to see if I like playing it.

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That’s what I did. Just went in with a completely open mind and came out changed forever.

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For me, slap is something handy in the bass players toolbox, but it can be too much sometimes. I like slap for a breakdown or in a mix. Tommy the Cat is over the top for me.

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Yeah, but being able to play it, or come close feels like an accomplishment.
I agree with your statement about being a good thing to have in your tool box, but not to be the only thing because I like the versatility, and try to be as versatile as I can.
I like music where this can be heard, And then changed up, not dependent on only slap, but has it, like Robert Trujillo comes to mind, and I have always liked him, except I don’t listen to Metallica, so more his earlier stuff.

Edit: I must include Flea in there

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What’s weird is Flea is one of my all time favorite musicians let alone bassists. All of his stuff is so damn melodic. And yes, it’s probably a great tool to know, especially if you plan on gigging. Most of Les Claypool’s stuff is over the top for me. I love him as a human being and a musician, just not his style.

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I think his being over the top, as it is being referred to, is probably what first attracted me to Les Claypool and Primus. I love the shock and awe factor the music does to your ear, making it perk up like a sleeping dog that heard a sound, and go “WTF”

Plus, having seen Primus live many times in the earlier days (90’s), I will say, they are one of the best live acts I have ever seen. They don’t rely on the “turn it up to 11, and blast their ears out”
The volume is just right, the OD and distortion are to a minimum, and you can clearly hear what they play and sing.

I say them at one of the lalapalooza ‘s, I think the 2nd. And bands like Alice In Chains, RHCP, and other big name bands of the era (I can’t recall the exact line up and don’t want to mis state something, so if you want the line up, I am sure it’s easily found.). All played on a pop up stage in a park. The sound was horrible, everybody pumped it up so most of the music for the whole day / night was shit. You had to find a sweet spot, which was hard to get to to hear much of anything. Until Primus played. You could hear it so much better then anybody who played before them, and the few bands that played after.
This is the same for places like the Palladium in Hollywood. Many bands have loud mosh fun concerts there, but with Primus, it’s still loud, mosh fun, but sounds great.
There is much to be said for that.
I really have not enjoyed anything after the first 3 albums the way I loved those. One of those three, “suck on this” is a live album, and again, for music of this genre, type, it is the best live album I know of.
But, to each their own. I like it, nobody else is expected to like what I like, or why I like it, it’s my humble opinion, you are certainly entitled to yours, and I am glad you shared it with me.

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@Kopusetic, I have not had the chance yet, so I will do it here, now. I love your screen name, it is GREAT

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I really love slapping, I just haven’t taken the time to get good at it. But it’s super popular here, along with double-thumbing. Actually @JoshFossgreen should do a double-thumb video if he hasn’t already. need to check his other youtube channel.

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Yep, I completely agree. Helps to be a complete bassists. I think most people expect you to be able to slap some. And, it’s always cool to see a bassist whip out a slap for a breakdown or a bridge.

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I’ve used that term for years-- now I know how to spell it!

Okay, I’m going to modify my earlier statement in which I asserted that I have no interest in slapping. In fact, I may have interest in slapping at some future date, but at the moment I disagree with some people’s claim that you need to slap to be a complete bassist. There are many accomplished bassists who don’t slap.
My goal is, and has been for the nearly one year since I picked up my first bass, to be a proficient bass player. My definition of “proficient” is to be able to pick up my bass, look at a sheet of music, and play it without the aid of tablature or even having to think about it: just look at the key, time signature, notes, and rests and just play. I’m not there yet, but I’m getting closer every day (I abandoned tab a long time ago).
Once I feel certain that I have reached that goal, only then will I consider enhanced skills such as slapping.
Everyone here has their own agenda, and I support each of them in their own personal endeavor on the bass. :guitar:

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Yeah, I’d agree - what matters is you can make music you like. If there’s a technique you’re not interested in there’s no rule that says you need to master it to be a good bassist.

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I wholeheartedly agree with what you disagree with. To be clear in reading what I just said, how I said it rather, I am agreeing with you.
Plenty of bassists / bass players don’t slap, not sure if they can or not, but they don’t. Then there are plenty of non pro, non famous players that can’t slap. Let me rephrase that, that never tried to slap, or never bothered to learn Slap, and that is great. If they are happy, I am happy.

I love to slap. I find it challenging, rewarding, and just plain Bad Ass. I do hope that everybody try it, long enough to be able to do it, and learn a song and do a play thru before deciding weather it is not for them. I think many will be hooked on slapping at that point, but, because we are individuals, and all different, there will be those that don’t like it, even after trying it.
But kudos to those that go that far toreally know it’s not for them
But that is just my hope, it’s not a reality that everybody will, and that’s fine, it is a diverse world, and we do not all dance to the same drum beat, thank god.

That is awesome @PamPurrs , it is also awesome how well thought out your path has been. I believe when you get there, and have completed your prerequisites, that you will give Slap a real, focused and structured effort, and that is all ai could hope for.
My wish for you is that you find it to be as rich and fulfilling of a journey as I did.

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@PamPurrs I have to agree, and I have the exact same goals as you do.

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