The Reaper Thread

CPU: for audio, the most important is single-core frequency, the number of cores is secondary in importance … for video, it actually really depends on the editing software. There’s a wide scale of different CPU/ram/VRAM/CUDA usage permutations across a lot of different editing software.

RAM: for audio, you start on 8 GB as a bearable minimum, 16 GB as ideal optimum, and 32 GB if you plan to use sample libraries ala Spitfire, etc. frequently … for the video you just bump the starting point to 16 GB and end at 64 as “RAM is not a factor in my workflow”

Graphics card: As I mentioned it depends on the software you will use. Davinci Resolve is fully dependent on a graphic card. Adobe After Effects or Vegas Studio not so much. (They are CPU dependent)

And, I would really try to get something with a solid-state drive at least as a system/application drive. It makes a lot and you can make everything absolutely smooth when you place your proxy files (substitute files for big format video files with the huge size used while working on the editing) on a solid-state disk.

Maybe I didn’t help you that much, but I personally think that the best way how to resolve this dilemma is to set an exact budget and then pick a machine that somewhat meets you there. All new PCs nowadays are absolutely capable of video editing and audio processing, what you pay your pennies while upgrading to a better setup is for “smoothness of operation”.

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As someone who does a great deal of video editing, I have to disagree with that statement. Sorry, but I have tried video editing with “less than standard” computers and it’s a nightmare.
Maybe if all you’re doing is editing your daughter’s birthday party in some basic video editor like VideoPad or Movavi Video Editor you can get away with a basic computer, but when it comes to using high powered editors such as Resolve and doing chromakeying and motion graphics and multi-cam, etc, only a high powered computer will work. As I mentioned previously, get a minimum 4gb VRAM, minimum 32gb RAM, and the best processor available.

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"“less than standard” … yeah, I will aggree with this one … I’ve forgot to specify “all new non-budget PCs” … however, as someone who edited videos as a professional on power rigs 10, 12 years back, even really slow PC nowadays is much smoother workflow than top of the line PC back then :smiley:

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Well yeah, I have to agree with you wholeheartedly on that one. Look at how much our technology has advanced in the past 10-12 years. However, I stand by my previous contention that I wouldn’t consider any computer with less than 4gb of VRAM and 32gb of RAM (or at least the capability to upgrade) if I was considering video editing with it.

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OK, that does really help from all the comments. The VRAM options seem covered but the 32Gb version look to be a little expensive. I could take more time and order one online and get it shipped but costs of getting big items here is expensive and big customs/tax duties. So better to buy local if I can. I’ll look online at the stores in my area, I only went in person to one of the big ones today.

Thanks to you all - I would not have had a clue about this otherwise!

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If you can get one that has the capabilities of upgrading the RAM to 32gb, get that one as long as it has the right VRAM. VRAM is burned onto the board, so it’s not upgradable.
RAM is not that expensive to buy if you want to upgrade after the purchase.

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OK - sure Pam, thanks. Yes I thought it was strange that the guy said they are not able to be upgraded from 16gb. I’ll check that with the store again. Also going to do some researching their online site as it may give a bit more detail. If that’s the case I’ll get one with 16gb and the VRAM with minimum 4gb and see if I can buy the extra 16gb and add that into the upgrade slots.

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I approach things like this with one logic…you can’t buy ‘too much’ power, but you can buy too little. As things progress over time you will need more and more, so, if you don’t “go big”, you will be ‘going again’ sooner.

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If you are doing a lot of video you might want to look for a desktop solution instead of laptop? Your laptop will make a lot of fan noise to cool those RTX (and CPU). Desktop has a lot better/silent cooling options and upgrade path. It’s also half the price what you pay for a laptop.

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All good responses @MikePhil ,
I tend to agree with @John_E , you can never have to much of anything, especially with computers.
I would go with as much as the budget allows, and that should enable you to achieve everything you want to do,
Good luck,
Cheers Brian

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With many modern laptops it’s generally important to max them out as much as possible on purchase because they are generally difficult or impossible to upgrade later (especially mac laptops, but also more and more PC ones as well.)

For music and video production I would absolutely recommend a desktop machine though. Or at minimum, an external monitor and real mouse for a really, really beefy laptop.

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If I would edit video and I really need a laptop than I would personally buy a new Macbook Pro. The M1 chip manages RAM in a different/efficient way but 16G is still the way to go. The Macbook Pro M1X will be announced this month iirc. Those are absolute beasts and will be silent to work with.

I fully agree with Howard here. If you are working with video and music you generally want an external monitor since 14/15/16 inch wont cut it. Might as well look into desktop imo. Personally I am waiting for the Mac mini M1X (hopefully released soon) which is gonna be a beast too and it’s so small you can just carry it around.

P.s. I work in Final Cut Pro.

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FCPX is great on our M1 mini. The M1X will be even better.

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Maybe someone here knows:
In Reaper, I can use ASIO in the audio settings so I can get my bass as an input. Output is then also over ASIO, so I use my Focusrite Solo as an input and output.

But I have wireless headphones that I am using at night. Those obviously aren’t ASIO.
Can I setup Reaper so it uses ASIO for inputs and WASAPI for output?

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Not that I am aware of.

Maybe better to get a wireless audio plug for the DAI’s headphone jack? Those look cheap. Something like this:

(much less expensive options than that too)

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ASIO Link PRO … it’s routing application for audio … it’s free now, but it’s hella complex … but it could do the trick …

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