Wall Hanging Basses

I think I’m getting to a point where I need to consider hanging my Basses and possibly Guitars on the wall.

My practice space also serves as my home office and occasionally as guest bedroom so whatever I go for has to both look good and be secure against accidental nudges from weary (and inebriated!) guests.

What are your favorite options for a secure wall mount solution?

2 Likes

I’ve never hung any of my guitars, but my son’s brother-in-law has something similar to these hangers from Sweetwater, @HowlinDawg

HTH and all best,
Joe

2 Likes

Uploading: A25D197B-A2A6-4A17-9369-ECCC219B1F90.jpeg…

I have all of mine hanging and some in stands on the floor. I use the hangers hangers like @Jazzbass19 Joe mentions above. They work really well.

3 Likes

Thanks Joe,

There is something like that available locally. I was a little concerned about the Bass getting a nudge and being knocked out of the hook. Are they properly secure when in the hooks?

Or there’s these, that close up when the guitar is in place.

2 Likes

I ordered these from Amazon. Comes in a two pack. Easy to install and sturdy.

4 Likes

Yes, there are a range of types, and some have locking capability. I just thought that link might give you some ideas, and you could branch out from there.

Again, I have not used any hangers for my own basses, but haven’t heard of any problems from my son’s brother in law. I’m sure that if somebody stumbled across it, they would knock it off the hanger, though. :roll_eyes:

Cheers
Joe

2 Likes

I’ve tried a few over the years and String Swing are the ones for me. The Hercules ones are ok but I had one fail on me
Obvious point but you’ve got to screw into a stud or wooden backing. I didn’t want my guitars 16” apart(standard wall stud spacing). So I built a wooden wall plate to allow a 20” spacing.

4 Likes

I’ll add string Swing to the list of options. :+1:

The backing batten is a good idea and could be made decorative as well as functional.

I have a solid concrete internal wall so spacing or finding a solid fixing wont be an issue but a wall plate could be a better option than drilling lots of holes if I’m hanging more than two or three brackets.

1 Like

@HowlinDawg sure that’s what I did. I found a piece of fir leftover from a custom cabinet I made for a client.
Also drilling into masonry sometimes isn’t as exact as framing. The drill could hit a piece of aggregate and shift slightly.
So glueing and drilling a decorative mounting board first would make it much easier to hit the exact marks for your wall hangers.
Any construction questions send me a private msg :+1:

2 Likes

Thanks @Barney, I may just have a suitable length of Cherry board in storage, will have to double check and see what I have. :+1:

1 Like

My concern has been somebody knocking the body into the wall as much as it is staying on the hook.

Does anyone have a recommendation for that?

1 Like

This?
image

3 Likes

Traffic cones on floor in front of them?
Velvet ropes?
I have been considering putting them in between all the albums with toggle bolts if no studs. I have so much crap on the floor all around the edges of the room it acts like a barrier.

image

2 Likes

I’ve been wondering if toggle bolts would be strong enough.

Also, frequent earthquakes of course.

1 Like

These look pretty cool

image

3 Likes

The ones with a front board definitely look sturdier.

Still scared about these basically becoming wall-clappers in earthquakes.

1 Like

Oh yeah, prob no good where you are. We don’t have that problem here … although having said that we had a 5.9 a few weeks ago, biggest one since records began. No damage luckily.

2 Likes

I think string String Swing sells a piece of foam you can stick to the wall so the bass does not mark the wall or dent itself.

And here it is:

5 Likes

Now friends, I don’t want to come across as a misanthrope but drywall has it limitations. It’s essentially crushed up gypsum sandwiched between paper. So structurally it’s not super strong.
I use toggle bolts in finished work all the time on renovations. Usually where there’s no backing in the wall. The client doesn’t want to cut out the drywall but wants some shelves in a bathroom cupboard.
I’ll make the ledger to support the shelf, glue the ledger with a strong adhesive and use toggle bolts to hold it in place. The glue actually does a lot of the heavy lifting here because the 2" ledger provides a large surface area which provides good shear strength. Plus they’re usually putting just towels or shampoo on the shelf.
What you’re looking to do is to hang a 9lb bass off a bracket that has a very small surface area.
So it’s not the weight that’s going to be the problem. Rather the constant (hundreds or thousands of time) loading and unloading of the bracket. Eventually the gypsum will crumble just like chalk, the paper will tear and at some point your new Dingwall will have a new dent in it.
You could use toggle bolts if you made a large backing plate that you could adhere to the wall but I can see from your’ videos that there’s little room to do this.
Maybe an alternative solution would be to remove the pictures. Buy a sheet of good one side plywood. You could paint it if you wanted. Attach this to the wall. Then hang your albums back up and the plywood would give you a blank canvas for you to drill and hang hangers wherever you want?

5 Likes

I have all my basses on the wall and I use the Hercules wall hangers.

http://herculesstands.com/international/products/fretted-and-bowed-instrument/guitar/wall-hangers/gsp38wb-plus/

That being said, even though Hercules says its foam does not harm the finish, it did. Please take not of that with any hanger you buy. It faded on all sorts of wood. Maple, wenge, okangol and mahogany. And it didn’t matter which finish. Even a thick lacquer showed light signs of discoloration. What I did to avoid further problems is wrap the foam with soft thin cotton terry towel type fabric. Haven’t had a problem since.

3 Likes