What are you struggling with?

Me too!

I missed out on the “long fingers” the day God created me, but glad I got the “good looks” part. LOL

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As much as i “enjoy” microshifting with my fat, stubby fingers, it really seems to present more of a challenge when playing a fretless bass. I have observed though that a lot of fretless players do not play much in the first 5-7 frets so maybe that’s the “secret” :slight_smile: esp if one wants to play false fingerings :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

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It’s been a few months since I had a fretless, but I don’t recall having any unusual micro shifting issues with it.
I played a fretless during the first part of Mark Smith’s Sight Reading course, which pretty much focuses on notes in the first position (frets 1-6) and didn’t have any particular issues with it (other than the usual intonation errors common on a fretless).

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Other than intonation erors… that’s exactly what I’m talking about. Microshifting makes it more difficult to be accurate because your hand is in a different location with respect to the frets. Every time you have to move your hand, you’re introducing more opportunity to put your fingers in the wrong spot. If you’re looking at the neck it doesnt matter quite so much, esp if it’s a lined bass. It’s not the end of the world, i generally play simandl the first 5 or so frets and switch to one finger per fret further up the neck.

Ideally, if one is fretting a fretted bass properly (right behind the fret wire), it’s not too hard to transition to fretless and intonate well.

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Agreed 100%. This is where muscle memory comes into play in a big way, which comes from lots and lots of practice (preferably sight reading).

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1FPF and microshifting are not mutually exclusive. 1FPF simply means that you play the four frets with four different fingers, not that your fingers are glued to their positions at all times.

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…or @JoshFossgreen :smiley_cat:

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Struggles right now are left-hand related. Long long ago, when I was 4, I got my left pinky finger caught in a door and nearly took the tip off. Thankfully, I didn’t, but from then on it was always a little deformed. The tip curls back quite a bit - getting it to curl the right way and press down with any kind of strength is difficult. Throw in the fact that I’m left-handed (even though I play the bass right-handed) and you have a lifetime of left pinky finger woes. So far I’ve been working around it by keeping my ring finger up close to it for “support”. Not sure if it will be a permanent workaround, or just a “one weird trick” to use until I strengthen it, but we’ll see as time goes on.

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Many experienced players play like this, they even support the ring finger with the middle finger.

Thankfully all my other fingers are strong. I lift weights (olympic style weightlifting mostly) so my grip has always been pretty good. Except that stupid left pinky. It just gets in the way. :stuck_out_tongue:

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I am almost done with the Bassbuzz lessons. I don’t know what to study next. I am not in a band or playing with anyone.

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Do the Hollywood Yakuza sort of thing - chop! :upside_down_face:

Seriously, though, I have led a very active life and all of my fingers and one thumb were dislocated at one point or another. They’re all dysfunctional to some degree. And fairly stubby at that. I find that the trick is to keep them moving and do warm up exercises regularly, and despite these shortcomings I’m progressing nicely along B2B. Well, for a given value of progressing and nicely.

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There is lots more to learn after you finish B2B. Check out this thread.

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