What's with the flame roasted stuff?

What’s the deal with flame roasted this and that? Necks, tops, fretboards/fingerboards… They are popping up everywhere…

Is that just a new craze/fad or is there more to it? I don’t remember them being around at all when I started playing bass (and that is not that long ago :wink:).

Enlighten me :smile:

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Is this something different than roasted maple necks? If not, AFAICT it’s a fad, but a nice looking one.

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Yes, maybe it’s mostly done on maple, not sure… but, yeah, that’s what I meant :wink:

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Thanks, @jacq - will need to watch more closely later. But, I think, that’s not quite what I was thinking of.

More stuff like this:
image

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That’s just quartersawn roasted maple. It is supposed to be stronger/more stable than a regular maple, and less susceptible to weather changes. And it looks nice :heart_eyes:

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The stronger/dryer part I feel is potentially hype, or at least unproven. But it looks amazing to me too yeah.

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You are right. Apparently, there is Roasted (Torrefied) and Flamed wood. Two different techniques. The latter seems like it is mostly for aesthetics rather than any function.

“Flame roasted” is IMHO marketing. The way I understand it “Flamed” is not necessarily “Roasted” :man_shrugging:

Here are other links I found about torrefaction:
https://www.pre-warguitars.com/torrefied-wood

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I have a combo of roasted and non, I can’t comment on whether or not it is stronger, but it is lighter and doesn’t need to be sealed. I have to adjust my truss rods throughout the year because I am in a tropical climate, and do less so on my ones that are roasted. I read on the internet (must be true) that it is actually cheaper production-wise to use roasted rather than finishing a standard maple neck. To add to the debate, there is supposed to be a sound difference. If I were you, I would replace all my maple necks at once!!! :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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I have a quartersawn neck on my Fender CS P bass.
I see no ‘tuning advantage’.
I actually think the whole ‘stay in tune’ thing is a bit bastardized:

  1. Stay in tune for a song?
  2. Stay in tune for a show?
  3. Stay in tune for a week/month/etc?

For 1 - one would expect this in general (except Hofners - this adds to their ‘charm’)
For 2 - is this really a thing…if you are plucking picking stretching strings what does a stronger neck have to do with it
For 3 - no one should expect this, period. this happens to me sometimes on a bass - I call it luck that the weather is exactly the same that day vs. the last time I played it.

Is it a stronger neck? - sure
Does it matter? - probably not, it is not the weak point in the system, the strings are

This is one of those ‘sure, it makes sense’ - but is it really?
However dry it ended up it will also have the potential to pick up moisture from humidity, maybe over a longer period of time vs. non-roasted, but all things equilibrate over time.

I think both are marketing hype based on ‘plausably explained’ things.
In my business, we have to back claims with actual data, or it does not go on the package. This industry, not so much, all you need to do is hint at something.
I am a science/engineering based person, and anything unproven via appropriate methods is just snake oil to me. I have zero clue what woods any of my basses are made with.

@joergkutter - I don’t have any roasted necks, I don’t care for them, and would not seek one out. If it was on a bass I fell in love with I wouldn’t not buy it becuase it had one, but am not seeking out this either. If one digs it, then dig it and look lovingly at it, but don’t believe the hype.

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I have 4 roasted maple necks in my collection. Are they more stable? Yes, they seem to be. I haven’t had to do any truss adjustments on any of them yet, even when seasons change. They feel great to play.

Are they stronger? No, roasted wood is more brittle. Does it matter? No, for the uses we put it too it’s not a weak point.

It’s hard to separate the hype. My roasted necks are the best necks/fingerboards I own. They just feel fantastic. Is that because they’re roasted, or because of build quality? Probably the latter.

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every neck should be flamed. the neck on the EB BFR duello is the most beautiful thing i have ever seen.

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More stable seems to be the operative word. Never say never, but you don’t have to deal with fret sprouts on roasted neck. They look great and feel great. Flame roasted even better, lol
IMG_3438


IMG_3440
IMG_3441

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That whole thing is gorgeous, Al. If I were a collector, which I definitely am not, I would love to own that bass, just for its sheer beauty.

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The tiger stripes were distracting a bit at first as I get caught looking at the fretboard quite a bit. Lol. I’m hoping to pickup a fretted version if/when they offer it.

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Hah I for one would not dream of using anything less than the finest maple, flame roasted by virgins under a full moon. For the tone.

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I could see truss rod and fret issues being less perhaps. Tuning? Nah

If you really don’t want to fiddle with truss rods, go big or stay home - graphite or aluminum etc. lolol

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I’d love that. PM me if you find one you don’t want. :wink:

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We should just add frets to that one @Al1885

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