When To Change Your Strings

I love the sound of new strings, but also, I am very lazy. So it took me another 6 months to change again. This time, I changed to cheaper strings than the previous ones. Last time, I went to Ernie Ball Cobalt Strings, this time Fender Super 7250’s. Though it is not out of the possible that those are cheaper, but still awesomer. Not sure if this Cobalt stuff is more like a marketing scam.

I got the same impression as last time: The new strings sound so much more awesome than the old ones. So I do think most of it is just that: newer strings. The next set I already have on my desk are Ernie Ball Regular Slinkies. But I guess it will be another 6 months, because I am lazy … :sweat_smile:

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It’s been just about 5 months since I exchanged my P-clone’s stock rounds for DHS Precision Flats. They are mellow and feel quite “noodly” to me. So mellow, in fact, that I almost always play with the tone all the way up. However, I love them, I set the action really low and have been able to engage in some SH-like clank. I’ve also played around with some Black Sabbath riffs and by picking over the fretboard and with a bit of OD and gain they sound really good. I’m definitely looking to put some more flats on this bass when the time comes, though I’ll likely go with Rotosounds next time.

That said, when my Peavey BXP* arrives on Wednesday, I look forward to replacing its stock strings with a set of Rotosound RL-66 stainless steel roundwounds that I have waiting for the right bass.

*Peavey’s take on the jazz bass

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Just realised that I have never changed a string on any of my basses. I carry spares for when one inevitably snaps, but until that happens, I just plod on.

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I change mine every 2-3 months depending on how often I play and record.

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I have never kept the same set of strings on a bass long enough to know when it’s time to change them. I have a shelf in my office closet that’s covered with packages of slightly used strings.

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I’m using Elixir strings. Very nice sounds out of the stainless steels (well, um, when my playing permits). They are ‘nanoweb’ coated (don’t ask). Expensive? - yes. But, no need to change them for at least 6 months, so: kinda cheap in the long run.

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When I was building the Poison Apple J-Bass, I took it to Terry at the Guitar Junkyard and he put the strings on, noting that the DR Lo Rider Nickel I had bought for it were designed more for a “rock” sound because of the nickel itself, and that the Lo Riders were designed more for slapping. He was actually the ones who recommended the Ernie Ball Super Slinky’s that I put on the Turquoise Waters P-Bass. When I bought the Poison Apple kit, it came with generic strings and I knew I’d never use them, so I went on a hunt for better ones and got the feel that the Lo Riders would be best for the J-Bass. Now, I’m not sure when to change the strings on any of the 4 because I don’t play them often enough, even for the lessons, which I restarted last night (I used the Poison Apple).

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If they feel good and sound good, they’re the right strings.

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In the p bass with flats and tort club, changing strings will automatically get you expelled and banned for life. Just saying… :upside_down_face:

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If you remove the string then you remove the dirt so you end up causing a whole lotta hurt? Don’t remove the gunk or you’ll lose the funk?

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