Do any of you use Chordify to learn songs?

I purchased a premium subscription to Chordify last August, but haven’t used it much. I’m just wondering how many people here find it useful for learning/developing basslines for songs.
My subscription is up for renewal in a month so I just want to make sure it would be worth me paying for again.

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I just looked it up and I’m not sure I understand what it does. You feed it some song and it writes it out just as chord progression for you and plays that so you can play around with that?

I would use it for free but not pay for it as I feel like I could easily create a chord progression in reaper with virtual guitar or midi piano or something and play bass with that.

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It’s been so long, I really don’t recall what the benefit of the premium subscription is. They had a special going at the time for an annual subscription, so I bought it.

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As far as I can tell you can transpose, change timing, export as midi, export on a music sheet and features like that…
I personally don’t see a feature I’d pay money for. I can see that it’s not much but I don’t see me using it. If I want to have the chord progression and can’t hear it myself then I’d probably use it and write the progression on a paper and work with that.

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Yeah, I probably won’t renew it, unless someone on here gives me a compelling reason to keep it.

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Hm, I don’t know how experienced you are with composing, but creating (good, internally consistent, and exciting) chord progressions is not THAT easy. Sure, you could say I want a I-V-VI-IV chord progression, but then you’d have to work on the voicings to make it sound “good”, and then perhaps some rhythmic variations and/or arpeggiation… And, is it going to be the same voicings all the time? And what if I want to get away from purely diatonic chord progressions? And how about chord substitutions to add even more variety/spice??

I think this is where a software can come in and help… Not sure whether that is exactly what Chordify does, but it could be… :wink:

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Basically, it shows you all the actual chords in the song, not necessarily the progression. So if you wanted to create a very simple bassline, you could just play the tonic for each chord, then add in an occasional 3rd, 5th, 7th, and an octave every now and then to create interest.

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Yeah, that’s my big problem with subscriptions. You have to use them, else you are throwing your money away. LIfe happens and gets in the way. That’s why I went for B2B, $249 and it will be there ready for me when have the time to take the course. This is also a big reason why I will never take a course from Scott Devine-- memberships. No point in lining his wallet while I am not learnin’ (sic).

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Ah, OK, thanks! So, I got it upside down… This software helps you identify the chords of a song where there might not be any sheet music etc available. Got it now :smile:

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Here’s the site…

You look up the song you want and it shows the chords

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How?
I mean to find a list of common diatonic chord progression or common almost diatonic chord progressions I don’t need software for that.
Everything else is also so dependend on the style you want to play or create so I don’t see the software taking that part of the work away.

Not saying the work you described doesn’t exist because it does. I just don’t see how software can be of help there.

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I have a free subscription to Chordify that I use sometimes to start learning a new song. It’s handy to have the cord progression scrolling along with the song. I don’t use it enough to go for a paid subscription though. I don’t remember how I ended up with the fee one.

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@juli0r I think you may be thinking more along the lines of writing music. Chordify is there to assist if you are learning to cover an already existing song.

Did I misunderstand what you said?

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Ummm… no but I said this:

While I meant just re-create a chord progression the free version of chordify spits out I worded it more like just a random chord progression @joergkutter chimed in that it’s not that easy to create a chord progression and said he thinks that software could help for that.

So yeah. It took a turn to writing songs instead of covers. Maybe I should create an account and see what it’s all about/what I get exactly.

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My bad - sorry for the confusion, guys :sweat_smile:

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I created an account and found the one possible reason to go for a subscription:
If the song you want to chordify does not exist already on the public platforms. But you gotta find such a song first if it’s a song that was published by a label.

As free user you can’t upload stuff so you have to take what is on yt, spotify and such.

Edit:
I tested it on one of my favorite songs. It has written out the chords fine but… couldn’t they have coded it to not have the same letter in the progression?
It’s Bb A and not A# A. At first I thought it was wrong but then I realized it’s the same tone but the notation is dodgy at least.

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During the course of this thread I cancelled my subscription, but later in the thread changed my mind. When I went to “uncancel” my subscription, they gave me a 50% discount on my renewal. SWEET!!!

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I don’t know why it would do that, I guess their computer needs to go to some music theory classes. :rofl:

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Maybe… but now I’m spiraling. Guess it’s too complicated for me as the chords aren’t necessarily played at once. I always just assumed that the song would be in a F major key. That said F major is played for I think 2 bars in the whole song and chordify also recognizes it as D major.
But D major has a F# minor chord in the diatonic chord progression and not a F.

If anyone is interested which song or wants to help me out with this: https://chordify.net/chords/f-sharp-live-tim-minchin-topic

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@juli0r If it’s in the key of F as the performer states in the song, then the diatonic scale contains a Bb at the 4th degree, which is what I’m seeing in the chords.

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