Top 10 Bassists (Who's Your Favourite?)

I love that tune! I covered it on my personal Youtube channel years ago, unfortunately the Record Company Powers That Be decided that nobody can see it because of copyright blah blah. (nevermind any arguments about fair use).

EDIT: I see @muff posted the tutorial video that still survives. I swear, I played the tune too, and totally nailed it! :stuck_out_tongue:

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As an artist I get why controlling copyright etc is important, but when it’s a guy in his bedroom playing his favourite song, I totally fail to get the company point.

Remember Chris Hadfield playing “Space Oddity” while actually in space? Bowie had to intervene to get the record company to extend the permission for it to be on Youtube. Madness.

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I’m just picturing being the person on the other end of that call.

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OMG, I just read thru this entire thread and damn have I missed a ton of great musicianship with my guitar biased ears. It looks like a lot of research for me in the near future, I don’t think I can expect to be even a decent bass player without listening to and focusing on the great ones. Anyway, to the actual point of this thread, my favorite bass player (for now I guess, lol) is the late Phil Kennemore from Y&T. Not the most technical, but very versatile and a cool songwriter. He knew when to shred and when to groove and was a really cool guy.

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Don’t forget David Hood and the swampers!

For fans of a bit of slap and tickle…
Wojtek Pilichowski


or in a more mainstream sense, Chris Wolstenholme from Muse.
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Man @oldthumper,… After watching this, all I can do is walk away with my tail between my legs… :grin::grin:

Thanks for sharing! Made my evening!! Loved it!!

Time to practice…

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Awesome!

That reminds me, Kiyoshi is in the studio recording her fourth album right now.

She’s still a rising star but she’s going to end up a serious contender for the best slap bassist out there. This cracked me up:

Q: Am I slapping too hard?
A: Probably not.

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I’m rather partial to Adam Clayton, but he’s never mentioned in “Great Bassist” lists.

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I think it’s cos he’s not a “tricksy” player. Not flashy. Nothing unnecessary. But he is solid, him and Larry are the heartbeat of U2. The other two just add more textures over the top of a wonderful layer created by the bass and drums. New Years Day is still one of my favourite intro bass lines ever.

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I think king of ‘unflashy but solid’ may well be John Illsley (Dire Straits). Man, some of the album tracks were 5 or 6 minutes long and he plays maybe a dozen different notes. Possibly the daddy of them all would be Private Investigations at 6m47s or the grinding Telegraph Road at 14m17s both with bass well to the front of the recording, so no hiding, but always solid as a rock and more than capable of the flashy stuff.

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Simon Raymonde is up there. This was a very typical performance.

It’s not even clear if he is breathing.

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The wonderful thing about learning an instrument, and especially in a great group like this, is the broadening of your horizons.

I haven’t always paid attention to who is playing what in which band (or on which track), but this morning I was playing some vinyl and was quite taken with the funky Jacksons-esque bass in Behind The Lines on Phil Collins’ Face Value. It is played by Alphonso Johnson who I hadn’t heard of, so I did a little Wiki-look and discovered that he was the bassist in Santana - one of my all-time favourite bands. Doh!

He’s into my Top 10 for his range, solidity, and clean sound.

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Mine too! Everybody always raves about Santana’s guitar playing, but I always tuned in to the awesome bass in their songs. I never knew who the bass player was either. Thanks for the info!

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Not sure how long or often he was with them. There were a few musicians who came & went and came back (I think). They always had an awesome percussion section too: I still watch that Soul Sacrifice set at Woodstock with the sublime 20 year old drummer Michael Shrieve (who I had always thought died months later, but he’s still with us).

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Don’t think I can pick one, but most of the players I love point to Jamerson as their biggest influence. A partial list: Bootsy,Larry Graham, Carol Kaye, Geezer, Tommy Shannon, Pete Way, Chris Etheridge, Robert DeLeo, Dug Pinnick. It’s probably Bobby Vega that I would want to be when I grow up.

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Oh my God, how did I forget Phil lynott?

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Can I double love that? :heart_eyes:

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I watched a documentary about Sting and remembered just how talented a musician he is. The instruments and styles he plays range from bog-standard rock bass through to Medieval English lute music. A talented song writer too and very quick to credit anybody who contributes to a piece.

So, add Sting to the list.

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Bill Wyman. He is the one I would like to emulate.

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